Reaching retirement is exciting, but having sufficient funds to really enjoy life during retirement cannot be overstated. You may have heard of a backdoor Roth IRA, but for those looking to maximize their withdrawals in retirement, a MEGA backdoor Roth IRA may be worth exploring.

What is a mega backdoor Roth IRA? Below we’re breaking down what you need to know about this retirement savings strategy, but first:

A Reminder About Traditional IRAs vs. Roth IRAs

The money you contribute to your Roth IRA is after-tax dollars, meaning you will have already paid income tax on it before putting it into your account. This means that the money grows tax-free and because you already paid taxes on that income before contributing it to your Roth IRA account, you do not have to pay taxes on it when you withdraw money in retirement. This, essentially, creates tax-free withdrawals in retirement.

If you choose to place your money in a traditional IRA account, you are using pre-tax dollars. This means the money has not been taxed, which can be an effective strategy in lowering your present taxable income. In return, the money in your traditional IRA account grows tax-deferred. Once you reach retirement and begin making withdrawals, you will be responsible for paying taxes on the withdrawals. This strategy could be beneficial if you anticipate being in a lower tax bracket once you stop working.

While both traditional and Roth IRA Accounts have different benefits for money going in and coming out they also share some restrictions. These include annual maximum contribution limits that may be adjusted annually by the IRS. Before contributing to your account, you’ll want to check these limits or simply ask me to help clarify.

Backdoor Roth IRA Explained

Roth IRA accounts have income limits. In 2021, you are ineligible to contribute to a Roth IRA account if you earn:1

  • $140,000 or more as a single filer
  • $208,000 or more as a joint filer

If you are a high earner with an income above the IRS’s income limit for Roth IRA accounts, you still have the option to create a backdoor Roth IRA. Just as it sounds, this option allows high earners to bypass the income limits and still utilize the tax advantages of a Roth IRA account.

I briefly discussed this previously but here is how to create a backdoor Roth IRA account in a nutshell:

  1. Call or email me to open and contribute to a traditional IRA.
  2. Convert your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA account (I will provide you with the necessary paperwork and instructions to do this).
  3. Once tax season rolls around, pay taxes on the contributions (essentially you’re paying back the tax deduction you received when initially contributing to your traditional IRA).
  4. Pay taxes on any additional gains your traditional IRA account may have made over time. If the contribution and conversion occur contemporaneously then this is a somewhat moot issue.

By doing this, you’ve created and funded a Roth IRA for yourself despite earning in excess of the stated income limits. Do this consistently and you will build a nice, tax free nest egg for yourself over the course of your working career.

 

What Is A Mega Backdoor Roth IRA?

A mega backdoor Roth IRA is a complicated strategy that allows high earners, or perhaps someone who experiences a windfall of cash, to contribute up to $37,500 in a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k) account – on top of their regular contributions. This option is not available to everybody, as some 401(k) plan providers do not allow it.

If you’re considering this option, you’ll want to work with your financial advisor or CPA to determine first whether it may be beneficial to you, and whether or not you may be hit with an unexpected tax bill as a result.

 

How Does a Mega Backdoor Roth IRA Work?

In order for a mega backdoor Roth IRA to work, your employer must allow after-tax voluntary contributions to be made to your 401(k) account. These contributions would be a separate bucket of money from your regular 401(k) contributions, and they would not count toward your 401(k) contribution limit. We would need to check with your human resources department or plan administrator to determine whether this option is available to you.

Next, we would need your 401(k) plan to allow you to move your after-tax money. They may allow you to remove money from your 401(k) plan (while you are still employed and working at the company) into either a Roth 401(k) portion of your plan or out into a Roth IRA account – separate from the original 401(k) plan.

If your plan does not allow for in-service withdrawals, you may be limited to waiting until you leave your job to have the opportunity to roll that after-tax money into a Roth IRA account. For most people looking to use a mega backdoor Roth IRA strategy, this may not be a suitable option, as it can shorten the amount of time your money can grow tax-free in an account.

 

Who Does a Mega Backdoor Roth IRA Work Best For?

Mega backdoor Roth IRAs are complicated strategies with lots of steps, and they aren’t ideal for everyone. This strategy is typically most useful for those who max out their regular contribution limits and/or earn too much to be eligible for a Roth IRA. In addition, these people will have a substantial amount of savings leftover that they’re ready to dump into the after-tax bucket of their 401(k).

If this doesn’t sound like you, you may be better off utilizing a traditional or Roth IRA account and your 401(k) account to save for retirement.

It’s not a simple process, but if you think a mega backdoor Roth IRA may be the right option for you, schedule a time for us to speak to go over the particulars of your households situation to determine if this is the right option for you. We can discuss some of the nuances of this process and answer any questions about your potential tax liability if you choose to use this strategy.

https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/amount-of-roth-ira-contributions-that-you-can-make-for-2021

This content is developed from sources believed to be providing accurate information, and provided by MBAM. It may not be used for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. Please consult legal or tax professionals for specific information regarding your individual situation. The opinions expressed and material provided are for general information, and should not be considered a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security.